Disc Jockey As Wedding Minister (Photo)

Who Makes The Best Wedding Officiants?

A recent survey looked at which people from various professions made the best wedding officiants and, not surprisingly, it’s those folks with the “gift of gab” that topped the list.

Out of all the “feeder” categories, radio announcers and disc jockeys were the clear-cut number one. Having to jump in with a few words before the start of a song, or having to talk off the top of your head before sending it over to the traffic report, radio people have the innate skills needed to perform marriage ceremonies.

Attorney or Lawyer as Marriage Officiant (Photo)

The “gift of gab” serves attorneys in the courtroom … and also when performing wedding ceremonies!

And with the shaky state of the radio industry, more and more radio personalities are lining their wallets with extra cash these days, picking up an extra $500 to $1500 each weekend by performing two, three or even four weddings!

Also high up on the list are attorneys. Not surprisingly, having a career that requires you to think on your feet and be prepared — or over-prepared — is a significant benefit when it comes to serving as a ceremonial minister.

Of course, attorneys make a pretty penny practicing law, so most barristers aren’t in the wedding business to earn extra dollars — most perform ceremonies for friends, clients and colleagues.

Teachers, especially those in secondary education, rounded out the top three. It appears that the same skills that help you communicate in front of a classroom full of students also comes in handy when you’re at the altar, and knowing that many teachers are scraping by from paycheck to paycheck, picking up an easy $250 to $500 for an hour’s work as a marriage minister on the weekend certainly helps to ease those financial burdens.

Interested in becoming ordained as a Wedding Minister? The process is fast and inexpensive! Click here to get started.

 


Bride and Groom Walking Downtown (Photo)

Are You Sure Your Ordination Is Legal?

In a recent article by church-growing expert Raul Rivera on the StartChurch blog, he asks a very relevant question: are you sure your ordination is legal? While the situation described in the article — whether the ordination of a minister by his former pastor is still valid — may be unique, the question of whether or not your ordination is legal, valid and acceptable in various jurisdictions is actually very common.

Pennsylvania Disclaimer of Liability (Excerpt)

In Pennsylvania, your online ordination credentials could be called into question. (Click to enlarge.)

Back to the blog cited above, which lays out the scenario:

Pastor Charles felt honored when he was asked to perform a wedding, especially since the bride and groom were his longtime childhood friends. They had all grown up together in the same Michigan town and attended the same church there. Later on, the engaged couple moved from Michigan to Ohio. They asked Pastor Charles to sign their marriage license and officiate their wedding in Ohio.

While your ordination may be legal, valid and acceptable in Michigan, using our example here, do you know if you can legally perform a ceremony in Ohio … or any other state outside your primary licensed area?

The simple answer is yes, but — unlike Michigan, which does not require Officiants to register prior to performing a ceremony — the State of Ohio does require you to register with the Secretary of State’s office in Columbus before the ceremony takes place, without exception.

Most ordaining organizations will provide you with the required forms to register with jurisdictions outside your primary licensed area (such as Arkansas, Oklahoma, Ohio, Minnesota, Louisiana, West Virginia, Maine and New Hampshire) for no additional fee. However, many organizations, including First Nation, will charge a small additional fee for the special documents and forms required to register in Hawaii, Nevada and New York City.

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Beach Wedding - The Toast (Photo)

How To Become A Wedding Officiant

Let’s say that you’ve been asked to perform the marriage ceremony for your best friend or, perhaps, your favorite cousin. What’s the process you must go through to become a wedding officiant or ordained minister?

Photo of a wedding officiant performing a marriage ceremony

You don’t have to be a priest or minister to become a wedding officiant!

Basically, the person performing a marriage ceremony must be legally ordained by a church or religious organization. Becoming ordained means that you are licensed to serve as an officiant (or celebrant, or ceremonial minister) and may perform weddings and other rites, such as funerals, baby blessings, and vow renewals.

Need to become ordained to perform marriage ceremonies? It’s fast and easy!

Click here to find out how…

You’re probably wondering how complicated the ordination process is, and how many years of education and on-the-job training you’ll have to undergo.

We’ll get those two questions out of the way immediately: the ordination process is actually quite simple, and there is no educational or training requirement — except one, which we’ll get to shortly.

Ordination simply means that the organization has confirmed who you are, made sure that you are of legal age to perform a marriage ceremony (in most states, it’s either 16 or 18 years old) and that you are capable of witnessing the bridal couple’s signatures on their marriage license, which you are generally required to return to the issuing agency (usually the County Clerk’s office) following the ceremony.

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